BitMEX Arthur Hayes Thinks There’s a Financial Crisis Coming, Here’s Why

Last week, global investment bank Credit Suisse made a radical prediction: that the dollar’s era as the world reserve currency is coming to an end and that commodity money – such as gold – will rise to replace it.

This week, BitMEX co-founder Arthur Hayes builds on those predictions. He, too, believes that hundreds of billions of dollars will flow into both gold and Bitcoin throughout the next decade. However, he is also “100% certain” that financial crisis and hyperinflation of the US dollar will ensue in the meantime.

Dollar’s Last Days

As explained in his recent BitMEX blog post titled “Energy Cancelled,” the freezing of over $600 billion in Russian foreign reserves will shake other world governments’ trust in storing their value in US treasuries. China in particular – which has the world’s largest budget surplus of over $273 billion annually – will no longer use this to grow its fiat currency position.

As such, Hayes’ calculations predict that China and other trade surplus nations will look to gold and other storable commodities to park about $967 billion in value annually, which used to belong to fiat currencies.

By contrast, this will severely weaken the strength of the U.S. dollar, which is already combatting the highest inflation it has seen in 40 years.


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“The phase shift will be chaotic, it will be volatile, it will morph, but it will 100% be MASSIVELY inflationary in fiat currency terms,” states the Exchange founder.

The Federal Reserve recently ended its U.S. Treasury Bond purchase program to help curb skyrocketing prices across the nation. However, as other countries move their wealth away from bonds and into commodities, the Fed will be forced to purchase US bonds again in order to finance its debt. These purchases will be funded, of course, through money printing, which will spiral into “hyperinflation.”

For context, the U.S. runs a $600 billion account deficit every year and had to sell $2.8 trillion worth of bonds to pay for that deficit in 2021 alone.

There won’t be much the Fed can do, either: Slight interest rate hikes will do nothing to make US bonds more attractive to other nations again. On the other hand, significant rate hikes would cause a recession, which politicians will not allow for.

Hayes: Dump Fiat, Hoard, Gold, and Bitcoin

Though Bitcoin is often referred to as “digital gold” by some investors, Hayes says that he is no maximalist. Bitcoin currently trades more like a tech stock than a safe-haven asset, indicating that the world doesn’t yet recognize it for its hard money properties. As such, governments will spill most of their money into physical gold for now, which has philosophical and historical precedent as a monetary instrument.

But that doesn’t mean that digital gold doesn’t benefit: Hayes remains “confident” that if this new gold era takes place, some central banks will choose to start conducting trade in Bitcoin instead of shipping gold around the world to pay one another.

“Again, I am fully confident that on a personal level if you believe you should spend fiat and save gold, the mental leap towards spending fiat and saving Bitcoin is minuscule,” he states.

The exchange founder concludes that gold will march to $10,000, and Bitcoin to $1,000,000, as the collapse of fiat triggers “the largest wealth transfer the world has ever seen.”

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